Thursday, April 24, 2014

Food and Friends has "Dining Out" night; more anti-gay violence and baiting in Africa reported as urgent


Tonight, I partook of the “Dining Out for Life” night for Food and Friends, at the “Cote d’Or” in Falls Church, VA.  The charity was to get a large portion of the tab, as well as special donations.
  
While at the French restaurant (remembrances of ninth grade) I checked a couple articles on the sudden eruption of anti-gay laws in Africa in the past few years.
  
“The Daily Beast” notes that western activism seems to stoke the fires, as gay people are made scapegoats for the past sins of colonialism, link here.
  
“The Week” has an “all you need to know” article March 30, here. Note the comment, sorted by "Newest", by "ahabsy:" claiming that those who support "gay rights" do not "care about the continuity of life" and that homosexuality threatens his children's futures.  In other words, he resents the idea that homosexual culture could influence his own descendants to have fewer children/ 
      
Gays have been targeted suddenly and heavily in both Nigeria and Uganda, with Uganda’s law also punishing others for not turning in homosexuals.  A group called “Human Rights First” has documented the crisis, and also covered the spread of Russian-style “propaganda laws” in former Soviet republics, here. The activities of certain evangelicals, including Scott Lively, is part of the picture in Uganda especially.  The article notes that homosexuality is legal in some parts of Africa still considered very unstable, including the Central African Republic and the Congo.  On the other hand, anti-gay laws are spreading to Ethiopia, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Zimbabwe, apparently, with rationalizations that sound childish to western thinking. 

A crisis could come quickly (as noted in the previous post) if there are appeals for asylum to avoid prison or death sentences.  But this was of appealing for help from citizens in western countries has not been attempted with Muslim countries;  would it with sub-Saharan Africa?  Eventually, the US State Department will probably have to comment. And it could put some Americans into a challenge as to what they can do.

Other media sources report about people from these countries who have already come here in various circumstances.  The total picture is still murky, and not well covered yet by the main media, even gay media.  

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